Park Avenue

611 PARK – VERNACULAR
An early 20th century vernacular house, with gable roof, projecting eaves, enclosed porch, and entry overhang. Shingled siding now painted. Built about 1915.

615 AND 621 PARK – AMERICAN FOURSQUARE
A pair of two story plus attic brick veneer “Chicago Square” residences. Matched pair in mirror image, but details differ. Elaborate Palladian dormers in hipped roofs; foundations of rusticated cement block. Front doors on each have wide sidelights. Four windows across second floor have 1-over-1 hung sash. Built about 1905.

620 PARK – BUNGALOW
A one-and-a-half story brick Bungalow, with broad gabled roof with extending rafters and barge boards; a pent roof over the front porch, and shed dormer windows. Constructed about 1915.

624 PARK – VERNACULAR
A two story plus attic vernacular style clapboard residence with intersecting gable roofs. Windows have flat hooded lintels and shutters. Front gable has extended bargeboard. Front door has sidelights. House appears to originally date from about 1867, but was remodeled about 1900.

625 PARK – VERNACULAR
Designed in the local Stick style vernacular, this two-story frame house with attic is composed of two intersecting gabled units and a front porch. Reticulated shingles contrast with smooth clapboard, and basketweave stick work is seen in the porch gable. Porch posts are turned with knobs. The gables are steeply pitched while a shed roof extends over the porch and a shed dormer extends from the roof ridge. Built about 1890.

629 PARK – GREEK REVIVAL / ITALIANATE
The original owner of the home at 629 Park was Leander Gregory. It appears to be a transitional Greek Revival / Italianate front wing, dating to about 1865, grafted onto an earlier Greek Revival house, built about 1850. The house retains a handsome front entrance, brackets and fenestration. The main structure is Italianate style with a low pitch hip room with extending eaves supported by double brackets. The entry includes transoms and sidelights. The entry porch is supported by Tuscan columns. The rear wing is of Greek Revival style with a large return supported by double brackets.

630 PARK – CRAFTSMAN
This two-story frame house features an array of early 20th century styles. The cubic massing and symmetrical fenestration, as well as a stylized segmentally arched portico, suggest the Colonial Revival. But the large brackets under the projecting eaves, the corbeled bay window, and the shed roof dormer are more eclectic in spirit. Built about 1900.

635 PARK – LATE PICTURESQUE
This large 2 1/2-story frame house, with steeply pitched gable roof reflects a greatly simplified late picturesque style. The gable eaves flare and a wide frieze board wraps around the house below the eaves. A Palladian window in the central gable provides a vaguely Colonial motif. A skirt roof above the first story may reflect an alteration. Constructed about 1895.

636 AND 644 PARK – QUEEN ANNE
Two and one-half story late picturesque residences with attics. Clapboard siding with remodeled front porch and entrance; has gable roof with extended gable front. Constructed about 1890.

643 PARK – QUEEN ANNE
Two and one-half story clapboard house with late picturesque/Queen Anne elements. Curved bay in front gable with stained glass; narrow clapboarding throughout. Broad turreted bay rising to a dormer over gable eave. Distinctive belt course articulating different levels. Two story screened porches, unfortunately altered. Entry altered to one more subdued. Built about 1890.

649 PARK – ITALIANATE / GREEK REVIVAL

Two story frame transitional Italianate / Greek Revival style residence with hip roof. Peaked lintels over tall windows. Two story sleeping porch at the southwest corner. “Greek Revival” entrance with side and toplights. Built about 1860, and presumably altered later.

650 PARK – PRAIRIE SCHOOL
Two story Prairiesque house with stucco siding. Windows are single, double or triple casements. Gable roof and porch roof have flared eaves. Built about 1910.

703 PARK – See Online Tour

704 PARK – See Online Tour

710 PARK – CRAFTSMAN
A two story plus attic Prairie/Chalet style residence with a large gable roof and extended eaves. The first floor is wood shingled while the second and gable wall are stuccoed with half-timbering. A large wall chimney is on the south facade. Foundation is of brick. Constructed about 1910.

715 PARK – PRAIRIE SCHOOL
Two story Prairie style influenced residence with hip roof. Segmented arches are in dormers. Facade is of tan brick with darker brick shade for window accent and chimney Prairiesque details. Built about 1915.

716 PARK – COLONIAL REVIVAL
Blending the late picturesque with the Early Colonial Revival, this two-story frame clapboard house has a hip roof, pedimented dormers, an oriel window and a projecting bay above the entry porch. The massing is nearly cubic and the clapboard siding is unornamented. Built about 1900.

721 PARK – QUEEN ANNE
First owner was Dean Colley of the Beloit College Anthropology Department. Built about 1905.

Two story plus attic late picturesque/Queen Anne residence with a truncated hip roof. Dormers include Palladian window with multi-prismed diamond detailing. Facade is aluminum sided.

722 PARK – LATE PICTURESQUE
A late picturesque house, with multiple-gabled roof and asymmetrical plan. Most of the character of the exterior has been forfeited to aluminum siding and new window sizes and shapes. Constructed about 1890.

731 PARK – AMERICAN FOURSQUARE
A two story plus attic early 20th century foursquare residence with shingled hip roof and shed dormers. Dormers have diamond pane detail. Second story and dormers are shingled while first story has clapboard. Second story has a bullseye window centered on front facade. Built about 1905.

737 PARK – STICK STYLE
Built in the local Stick style, the clapboard exterior of this two and one half story frame house is divided into panels by the use of horizontal framing boards and corner boards. Between the first and second story is a band of vertical boards. The gable is tall and steeply pitched with a projecting eave supported by brackets. The box bay window on the first floor is left unornamented. Built about 1890.

738 PARK – LATE PICTURESQUE
This asymmetrically composed house, with intersecting gables and tall proportions, has several elements of the late picturesque style. The projecting gables are pedimented with modillions under the cornice. Walls of the side bay are chamfered. Brackets, leaded glass and a corbeled brick chimney contrast with the unornamented clapboard siding. Constructed about 1890.

742 PARK – CRAFTSMAN
A two and one-half story brick modified Western Stick/Prairiesque house. Roof has a flared eave with exposed rafters and a dormer to the side. The entry at the side center resembles a porte cochere. The quiet of the dark brick surface of the first floor interplays with the staccato patterning of the stucco and timbering of the second story, as they articulate the window groupings. Chimney ascends centrally on front boldly drawing the eye straight into the heart of the design. Construction date unknown.

743 PARK – QUEEN ANNE
An eclectic mixture of Queen Anne motifs, this frame house has intersecting, pedimented gables, slant bays and chamfered walls, and a pedimented veranda supported by unfluted ionic columns. Aluminum siding covers the original fabric. The front door has been blocked and the front steps removed. Built about 1895.

746 PARK – PRAIRIE SCHOOL
Built in 1922 on the first lot of Dazey’s Subdivision, this house was originally the residence of C. A. Dazey himself, a realtor and developer.

Combining elements of a vernacular Prairie style with detailing borrowed from the Arts and Crafts movement, the house is an architecturally significant example of the eclecticism that distinguishes Beloit architecture in the 1920s. The two story brick and stucco house has a marked horizontal character with emphatically rectilinear detailing. The low-pitched hip roof, its flared eaves extending well beyond the walls and supported by thin rafters, underscores the low profile of the house. Even the dormers are tucked into the roof so as to avoid the suggestion of verticality. The facade is divided by horizontal wooden bands which run beneath the cornice and separate the two stories. Banded windows, framed by Stick-like detailing, punctuate the second story. Between the two stories, a large opening – three banded leaded casement windows above three larger ones, surrounded by a heavy frame – is punched into the facade. Beneath that window, a rounded doorway is recessed into a round brick arch which is supported by stylized brick buttresses. The windows on the first floor are banded into groups of three but are otherwise unadorned. The final effect is unique, an example of “progressive” eclectic fashion. The Dazey House was constructed in 1922.

749 PARK – VICTORIAN VERNACULAR
This house was owned for many years by John Chamberlin, brother of Thomas C. Chamberlin, the Beloit College graduate who was the founder of the Geology Department at the University of Chicago, and later a President of the University of Wisconsin.

A Victorian vernacular frame cottage, with L-shape plan and gabled roofs. A front porch extends along the length of the side wing. The clapboard is unornamented and the windows are surrounded by simple trim and architraves. This house was built about 1870.

802 PARK – See Online Tour

808 PARK – See Online Tour

816 PARK – LATE PICTURESQUE
Two story plus attic Late picturesque/Queen Anne clapboard house with pyramidal hip roof. Bracketed eaves. Dominant porch with smooth Tuscan pillars, and a balustrade. Windows are 5-over-1 lights with a diamond pane in center. Corner pilasters on second story. Prairiesque chimney with simple massing. Rusticated concrete block foundation. Construction date unknown.

819 PARK – See Online Tour

822 PARK – GEORGIAN REVIVAL
Georgian Revival in inspiration, this two-story house of variegated brick also features non-historical detail. The eaves of the low-pitched gable roof extend over the walls in a echo of the prairie vernacular. The fenestration, while symmetrical, is sparse and broad. The dormer is also broad with a low segmental pediment. The entry features a segmentally arched pediment with pilasters, fan light, and side lights. Brick quoins frame the house and a porte cochere and sun porch buttress the composition on either side. Built about 1915.

825 PARK – QUEEN ANNE
A large frame Victorian house, with multiple gabled roof, chamfered bay walls, and porch with Tuscan columns. Detail is reduced by composition siding. Constructed about 1890.

830 PARK – QUEEN ANNE
A late picturesque frame house with multiple gables, tall proportions and chamfered bays, the exterior has been largely stripped of detail by the asbestos siding. Constructed in about 1890.

831 PARK – QUEEN ANNE
A large late picturesque house, with intersecting gabled roofs, overhanging eaves, and projecting bays. A front porch with Tuscan columns and simple entablature embraces the front facade. The clapboard siding is narrowly gauged and provides a taut, smooth surface. Built about 1895.

835 PARK – TUDOR REVIVAL
Built in 1912 by George Macklem. Two story plus attic Eclectic Resurgence / Tudor composed of brick on the first floor and stucco and half-timbering on the second and attic. Stone Gothic entrance bay to the west and oriel window to the north. Sweeping pent roof over dormer to the east. Prairiesque chimney rises through the pent roof. Four vertical glass panes over one.

836 PARK- COLONIAL REVIVAL
A Colonial Revival frame house, with hip roof, frieze board, pedimented dormers, and Tuscan- columned porch. Although the side bays project, the massing is nearly cubic and the clapboard is unornamented. Constructed about 1900.

842 PARK – QUEEN ANNE
A late picturesque vernacular, with hip roof, cross gables and an unornamented asbestos exterior. The frame house rises 2 1/2 stories in height and has an irregular roof line but rectangular massing. Built about 1890, in 1937 this house was moved to 842 Park from across the street.

847 PARK – AMERICAN FOURSQUARE
A variation on the Colonial Revival, this two-story frame house has a hip roof with projecting eaves, a front porch, central dormer and cubic massing. But the projecting of the eaves and the attenuated rafters which support it, suggest a Western Stick style influence. The clapboard siding is unornamented and the door is framed by sidelights. Built about 1910.

849 PARK – DUTCH COLONIAL REVIVAL
A modified Dutch Colonial with gambrel roof and dormers. A frieze board beneath the cornice and the entablature of the front porch remain unaltered, but the house has been sided and remodeled. Constructed about 1895.